Our Customers | Runaround: Rabbit and Guinea Pig Runs

Our Customers | Runaround: Rabbit and Guinea Pig Runs
The range of phyla detected was very similar to that seen in the comparison between the domesticated rabbit and guinea pig faecal samples: Actinobacteria; Bacteroidetes; Firmicutes; Proteobacteria; and Tenericutes being detected. In addition there were a number of unclassified sequences. As seen with the rabbit faecal samples previously, there were no sequences from Fibrobacteres. Although five different phyla could be identified, and four of them were present in all animals, only two of them (Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes) were present in relatively large numbers in all animals. shows the relative abundance of each of these phyla within the animals.
Our Customers | Runaround: Rabbit and Guinea Pig Runs
Thus it appears that there are major differences in the microbial population of the digestive tracts of the rabbit and the guinea pig, and between organs within a single animal. While some of this may be due to dietary preferences between the animals, it nevertheless suggests that it is unlikely that there is a single inter-species microbial population which is responsible for allowing an animal to live a caecotrophagic lifestyle. Our Customers | Runaround: Rabbit and Guinea Pig RunsOur Customers | Runaround: Rabbit and Guinea Pig RunsOur Customers | Runaround: Rabbit and Guinea Pig Runs
Mating occurs in captivity, both between buck rabbit and female guinea pig, and vice versa. There are also old claims that hybrids of this type have actually been born. In the June 30, 1906 issue of the English magazine the editor, E. Kay Robinson, gives the following brief response, entitled “Guineapig-Rabbits,” to a letter from a subscriber who, apparently, claimed to have hybrids of this sort: Brandt's Mill makes our own rabbit and guinea pig food right here at the mill! We also stock Oxbow and Zupreem foods.

Brandt's Mill has scrumptious treats for your rabbit or guinea pig. We also carry an array of vitamins, timothy hay, cages, water battles, food dishes, harnesses, running balls, litter bins and specialized small animal litter.To see some of our rabbits and guinea pigs in need of good homes please go to the relevant tabs above . We hope you will love our rabbits and guinea pigs as much as we do and be able to provide a safe and loving home should you choose to adopt from us.But anyway Corriegirl, sorry I do not know but you could try looking on websites such as Pets at Home and seeing what animals the rabbit and guinea pig foods feed etc.Kelly: The guinea pigs have sometimes pulled tufts of fur out of the rabbits, and one guinea pig bit a rabbit ear once. The rabbits have never shown any aggression toward the guinea pigs.Melissa: The problem is that it depends A LOT on the individual rabbits and guinea pigs! A lot of people have posted that rabbits will bother or hurt guinea pigs. I actually found the opposite to be true. For me, it was always the guinea pigs who picked on the rabbits. Guinea pigs and rabbits have very different body language. When a guinea pig chatters its teeth, for example, that is an angry sound. For rabbits (if quiet) it's purring.Also (and I'm not saying you do here but...) rabbits and guinea pigs should never be housed together. Rabbits can very easily kill guinea pigs. One kick is all it takes.This study aimed to determine the microbial composition of faeces from two groups of caecotrophagic animals; rabbits and guinea pigs. In addition the study aimed to determine the community present in the different organs in the rabbit. DNA was extracted from seven of the organs in wild rabbits (n = 5) and from faecal samples from domesticated rabbits (n = 6) and guinea pigs (n = 6). Partial regions of the small ribosomal sub-unit were amplified by PCR and then the sequences present in each sample were determined by next generation sequencing. Differences were detected between samples from rabbit and guinea pig faeces, suggesting that there is not a microbial community common to caecotrophagic animals. Differences were also detected in the different regions of the rabbits’ digestive tracts. As with previous work, many of the organisms detected were Firmicutes or unclassified species and there was a lack of Fibrobacteres, but for the first time we observed a high number of Bacteroidetes in rabbit samples. This work re-iterates high levels of Firmicutes and unclassified species are present in the rabbit gut, together with low number of Fibrobacteres. This suggests that in the rabbit gut, organisms other than the Fibrobacteres must be responsible for fibre digestion. However observation of high numbers of Bacteroidetes suggests that this phylum may indeed have a role to play in digestion in the rabbit gut.