Zebra Finch Personality, Food & Care | Pet Birds by Lafeber Co.

The parent zebra finches will take turns gagging up food to feed to the hatchlings.
Zebra Finches, like most estrildid finches, are primarily seed-eating birds, as their beaks are adapted for dehusking small seeds. They prefer millet, but will consume many other kinds of seeds as well. While they prefer seed, captive Zebra Finches will also eat egg food. They are particularly fond of spray millet, and one or two of these small birds will eat a spray millet stalk within a few days. Zebra Finches are messy and voracious eaters, typically dropping seed everywhere. This behavior spreads seed around, aiding in plant reproduction. The availability of water is important to this bird's survival, therefore the Zebra Finch will drink often when water is available. A typical Zebra Finch may be plump, because it eats quite often throughout the day.
Zebra Finch - 2 new Penguin hatchlings begging for food after a fresh bath right before their next feeding ~ they are so plump & healthy!
A standard will be fine with Timor Zebra finches. They do have a preference for the smaller seeds in the mix and may push aside the large white millet in the mix, returning to them only after the other seeds are eaten. They eagerly take egg food (), greens and soaked seed, although I rarely feed the later two. and in the form of crushed egg and oyster shells and cuttlebone should always be available to them. Zebra Finch Eating Egg Food! HD - YouTubeMixing up egg food for the zebra finches - YouTubeHow to make (healthy) Zebra Finch (and budgie or parrot) food
A standard will be fine with Zebra finches. They eagerly take egg food (), greens and soaked seed, although I rarely feed the later two. Zebra finches are adapted to survive and raise their young on lower protein levels than many other finches and can actually raise their young on seed alone. This is not advisable however since the young will be of substandard quality. Grit and in the form of crushed egg and oyster shells and cuttlebone should always be available to them. Zebra finches will usually decimate a cuttlebone and although crushed hen's eggs have a higher calcium level, picking at the cuttlebone seems to keep the beak in shape and relieve some frustration that they might otherwise take out on another bird's feathers.The Zebra finch is a highly adaptable species that will breed under the most adverse conditions. It is the perfect avicultural specimen. It can take extremes in temperature, is highly resistant to disease and parasites, can survive on minimal food and water of atrocious quality, requires minimal space and gets along well with other of its kind and other species and will attempt to breed in any of those conditions. There was a report of wild specimens that were captured and placed in a holding cage attempting to breed while that cage was still in the back of the vehicle. Now that's a ready breeder! In the wild, the rains trigger the breeding season. Wild males will begin courting as soon as 48 hours after the first rains. With the domesticated Zebras, they are nearly always ready to breed. For some, it is more difficult to get them to stop breeding than to start and the only way I have found to stop them is to remove the nest box. This won't stop the hens from laying eggs, but it does remove a formal nest that they will defend, lay and incubate eggs in.The basic food of a Zebra finch is seeds. Various varieties ofmillet is their staple. Buy a commercially prepared mix. Thiswill be a balanced mix and this will do very well for your birds. It needs to be fresh, so don’t buy a fifty pound bag for two birds. Buy an amount that will be used up in about a month. Their seed cupshould always have seed in it. They will regulate how much they needto eat.A standard finch mix will be fine with Timor Zebra finches. They do have a preference for the smaller seeds in the mix and may push aside the large white millet, returning to them only after the other seeds are eaten. They eagerly take egg food, greens and soaked seed, although I rarely feed them the soaked seeds. Grit and calcium in the form of crushed egg shells, oyster shells and cuttlebone should always be available to them. I supplement vitamins and minerals in my prepared egg food.